There, and yet not there: Research project seeks to bring about new interactions between humans or machines in cyberspace

For some years now, we have become accustomed to communicating with each other online via Zoom, FaceTime & Co. Even surgical procedures and industrial manufacturing can now be performed remotely. A research project, recently approved by EU Horizon Europe, aims to advance the next generation of immersive telepresence technologies: In the process, the boundaries between the virtual and physical worlds are set to become ever more blurred, and the technology is expected to make it much easier for us to “be” in a different location without actually having to travel there.

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Follow what interests you, and don’t be upset by setbacks

Harald Gietler has just finished his PhD in Technical Sciences, specializing in Information and Communications Engineering. His research work focuses on localization technology. Instead of radar or sonar, Harald uses electromagnetic fields. We talked to him about his field of research and the influence of artificial intelligence. Moreover, he also told us about the reasons why he decided to study at the University of Klagenfurt and why he would advise others to study in Klagenfurt too. Read more

Enjoying the creativity of mathematics

Research mathematics is creative. One of those people with a particular affinity for imaginative puzzle-solving is Sarah Jane Selkirk. The South African came to Klagenfurt in 2020 as a doctoral student and is now a member of the doc.funds doctoral school “Modeling – Analysis – Optimization of discrete, continuous, and stochastic systems”.

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Swarm algorithms can improve production planning and scheduling

Industrial companies face an enormous challenge when it comes to the highly interconnected nature of their production facilities. These exhibit complex and dynamic behaviour, as can be observed in ants, bees, fish or birds. Inspired by models found in nature, the SWILT project models entire industrial plants as swarms. Three years on, we now have the results of the project: The simulations revealed that the overall performance of a large production planning system can be improved by a percentage in the single digits, which can represent significant financial gains for businesses.

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Dženana Alagić: “Use the university to expand your horizons, study and enjoy!”

Dženana Alagić recently completed her doctorate in Technical Mathematics. She spoke to us about her research focus and told us why she moved from Bosnia and Herzegovina to Klagenfurt. Furthermore she told us how her view of the world has changed through her studies and why everyone should study at the University of Klagenfurt. Read more

Second place in Austria and placed in ranking group 201-250 worldwide: Information and Communications Engineering achieves major success in THE Ranking 2022

The THE Ranking 2022 represents the first time that the University of Klagenfurt has also been ranked in the field of “Engineering”. Being ranked second among Austrian universities at the first attempt is due in no small part to the outstanding research achievements of the scientists and the field’s high degree of internationality. The relatively young Faculty of Technical Sciences is confident in maintaining its chosen course – and continues to reach for the stars.

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Best paper award for work on swarmalator systems

Working together in the FWF project “Self-organizing synchronization with stochastic coupling”, Udo Schilcher, Jorge Schmidt, Arke Vogell and Christian Bettstetter co-authored the publication “Swarmalators with stochastic coupling and memory”. This paper won the Karsten Schwan Best Paper Award at the IEEE International Conference on Autonomic Computing and Self-Organising Systems (ACSOS) on 30 September 2021, a prize that recognises the best paper presented at the conference.

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Self-evaluation tool for teachers: How well do I teach?

When it comes to evaluating the teaching of teachers externally, there are many challenges for everyone involved. However, a self-assessment tool can provide teachers with valuable feedback on the quality of their teaching without openly questioning their abilities. Elisa Reci, a doctoral student at the Department of Informatics Didactics at the University of Klagenfurt, has developed a platform for this specific purpose.

“We need clearly defined standards for different quality levels, and we have been working on these together with experienced teachers,” Elisa Reci tells us, offering a basic explanation of the tool she has developed as part of her doctoral thesis. These precise criteria have now been modelled and incorporated into an online tool that is available to all teachers. “We want to support teachers in reflecting on their teaching and making it even better. This means that the teachers learn: How good am I? And how good do I want to be?”, she goes on to explain.

Originally from Albania, Elisa Reci, who completed her Bachelor’s degree with distinction, came to Klagenfurt for her Master’s degree in Informatics. When she returned to her native country, she spent three years working as a lecturer at the university and as a computer science teacher at a secondary school. “I became very aware that we are struggling to get enough young people interested in computer science, both at school and at university”, Reci tells us. Elisa Reci attributes the hesitancy in choosing to study computer science to the quality of computer science teaching, among other factors: “Ultimately, how well the teaching goes depends on the teacher and their motivation.”

Elisa Reci originally designed her model for computer science classes. However, it soon became apparent that it was also very suitable for other subjects and could generally be a useful support for all teachers, whether they work at the university, in schools, in further education or in other educational sectors.

Elisa Reci returned to the University of Klagenfurt as a predoc scientist and doctoral student and has devoted the past four years at this university to her research. She has already presented her model and the platform at several conferences and in scientific journals, and it has generated a lot of interest. Her contract at the University of Klagenfurt recently came to an end. For now, Elisa Reci wants to stay in science: “I would like to continue my research as a postdoc scientist and am currently looking around to see what opportunities are opening up.”

Visit the self-evaluation platform: https://team-iid.aau.at/welcome

A few words with … Elisa Reci


What motivates you to work in science?

We can all hope for a better future if the generations of tomorrow are well-educated. This motivates me to seek out new ways to improve education.

Do your parents understand what you are working on?

Yes, they do.

What makes you furious?

Injustice.

And what calms you down?

A smile and a hug from someone with a good heart. Every kind gesture motivates me to fight for and demand a better world.

Who do you regard as the greatest scientist in history and why?

I think that every discipline has its important scientist, as each contributes to different areas of life. I would like to single out medicine, as it has the protection of human life at its core.

What are you looking forward to?

To keep working on what I love.

Pasquale Grippa: “Research and cultural diversity widened my horizons.”

Pasquale Grippa recently completed his doctorate in Technical Sciences. He spoke to us about his research focus – improving autonomous transport systems with the help of artificial intelligence. Pasquale has developed an algorithm for e.g. optimising drone-based delivery systems  to answer questions such as: Which customers does the drone have to serve? Where does the drone need to pick up the package and where can it charge its battery?

He also told us why he moved from Italy to Klagenfurt, how his view of the world has changed through his studies and why everyone should study at the University of Klagenfurt. Read more

Nicolò Gusmeroli: “The university always has new things to propose and to experience.”

We talked to Nicolò Gusmeroli and asked him why he came from Italy to the University of Klagenfurt. He told us about his PhD programme in Technical Mathematics and the challenges and opportunities he experienced during his studies.  Read more